BFP Exclusive Report- Open Source: A Distillation of DOD Funding Priorities, July 2013

DOD Spent at Least $16,000,324,569.00 on 238 Distinct Contracts during July 2013

The Pentagon issues a list of contracts every business day around 5:00PM local time. Each list, a jumble of technical terms, is organized according to the purchases made by each military branch (e.g. Army, Navy, and Air Force) and institution (e.g. DARPA, Missile Defense Agency, and Defense Information Systems Agency). This project provides a distilled presentation of these contracts in an accessible form.

The Department of Defense spent at least $16,000,324,569.00 on 238 distinct contracts during July 2013. These funds went to many areas (e.g. Foreign Military Sales, operations in Afghanistan, Salient Contracts, and unmanned aerial systems). The following is a valuable resource for academics and concerned citizens alike.

FOREIGN MILITARY SALES

Through Foreign Military Sales (FMS), the U.S. government procures and transfers materiel to nations and international organizations. During the month of July 2013, the Pentagon issued the following twenty-three FMS contracts, which involved twenty-eight countries. Saudi Arabia received eight contracts, which was more than any other country. Boeing was patronized more than any other corporation, having received five distinct contracts. The FMS breakdown for July 2013 follows:

Advanced Technology Systems received $26,666,806 for procuring tetra trunked radio communication systems for the Lebanese Armed Forces.

AECOM Technical Services, CH2M Hill International Services, HDR Engineering and URS Group receive a maximum $9,000,000 for administrative and general management consulting services. This contract involved the following countries: Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Mongolia, New Zealand, Palau and Papua.

Airborne Systems North American of CA received a maximum $12,945,226 for the procurement and inspection of MC-4 personnel parachutes. This contract involved only the Republic of Korea.

BAE received $9,222,314 for engineering services in support of the MK 41 vertical launching system. Parties to this contract were: the U.S. Navy (96.02 percent); South Korea (3.49 percent = $321,859); Netherlands (.38 percent = $35,045); and Canada (.11 percent = $10,145).

Boeing received $109,461,580 for services in support of the Royal Saudi Land Force Aviation Command. Boeing received $15,425,233 for procuring Apache Block III aircraft for Saudi Arabia. Boeing received $17,028,790 for the procurement of CH-47 cargo aircraft for Australia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Boeing received $75,598,874 for providing courseware development and training during the Royal Saudi Air Force’s transition from F-15 variants to the F-15SA weapon system. Boeing received a maximum $7,745,923 for providing the Netherlands with sustainment services in support of the Apache AH-64D.

Booz Allen Hamilton received $21,743,595 for providing training, education, engineering, financial management, C4I, EW, personnel management, technical support and logistics. This contract only involved the Royal Saudi Naval Force.

DRS Radar Systems received a maximum of $8,105,505 for the procurement of a border surveillance system for Egypt.

Exelis Inc. received a maximum of $7,553,934 for the procurement of night-vision devices and related equipment for Canada.

General Dynamics received $67,456,648 for the procurement of hydra rockets, warheads and related parts in support of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force and Saudi Arabia.

HELLFIRE Systems received $7,582,999 to “convert HELLFIRE II Romeo Air-to-Ground Missiles to AGM-114R2 and AGM-114R9E.” The parties of this contract are: Australia, Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

Kay and Associates received $36,698,404 for providing Kuwait with F/A-18 contractor maintenance support services.

Lockheed Martin received $12,980,000 for “the advanced procurement of one Israel C-130J-30 aircraft and for providing Israel with “field services representatives.” Lockheed Martin received $308,321,789 for the procurement of tactical missiles and launcher modification kits for Kuwait. Lockheed Martin received $37,375,568 to provide the UAE with services “in support of the enhanced launcher electronic station cost reduction initiatives.”

Northrop Grumman received $45,987,322 for the “production of proof of manufacturing/first articles, functional item replacement level components of the MK 54 mod 0 array kits, engineering service and support. The parties to this contract were the U.S. Navy (52 percent); Australia (41 percent = $18,854,802); and India (7 percent = $3,219,113). Northrop Grumman received $10,397,099 for services in support of critical components for U.S. and Coalition Partners in Afghanistan.

QinetiQ North America received $7,772,646 for procurement of Talon IV EOD vehicles, spares and training. This FMS contract went to Pakistan.

Raytheon received $19,070,236 for Standard Missile engineering and technical services. Parties to this contract were: Japan (28 percent = $5,339,666); Australia (24 percent = $4,576,857); Korea (21.5 percent = $4,100,101); Germany (8.3 percent = $1,582,830); Netherlands (8.3 percent = $1,582,830); Taiwan (7 percent = $1,334,917); Canada (1.7 percent = $324,194); Spain (1.2 percent = $228,843). Raytheon received $83,785,417 to provide UAE with technical services for AN/TPY-2 radars, which are “being delivered as part of a whole FMS case as an element of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system.”

Rockwell Collins Simulation & Training Solutions received a maximum of $22,240,000 to provide Saudi Arabia with transportable Black Hawk operations simulator devices.

Seiler Instrument and Manufacturing received a maximum $20,727,996 for the procurement of M2A2 Aiming Circle instruments. This contract involved the following countries: Afghanistan, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

SALIENT CONTRACTS – ALARMING PENTAGON FOCI

From these contracts we learn DARPA, the Pentagon’s most advanced research arm, is tinkering with social media in an effort to sway public opinion. Other alarming foci are present below. If these contracts are any indication, the U.S. tax-dollar is being spent on questionable aims:

A-T Solutions received a maximum $16,834,335 for services “in support of the Asymmetric Warfare Group’s mission observe, train and advise how to defeat asymmetric and hybrid threats.”

BAE received $29,023,781 in order to support DARPA’s Insight program, which is developing an adaptable, integrated human-machine exploitation and resource management system.

Utah State University Research Foundation received a maximum $12,000,000 for R&D services in support of the Precision Lightweight Weapon and Sensor Mount program. [Editor’s note: This is another example of the Pentagon using academia to further its own narrow military goals. One might contend that lucrative Pentagon funding can corrupt university research while diverting finite academic resources towards the purposes of war.]

IBM received $7,788,423 for the development of a scalable graph analytic and statistical learning methods to detect abnormal behavior from large, dynamic and heterogeneous media.

Berry Aviation received $10,725,000 for Trans-Sahara short take-off and landing (STOL) services. The Trans-Sahara STOL contract provides for casualty evacuation, personnel airlift, cargo airlift, and air drop services. Work will be performed throughout Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, South Sudan, Tunisia, and Uganda. The estimated date of completion is 27 June 2017. Some of this funding comes from Joint Special Operations Air Detachment 3400 Operations and Maintenance funds. [Editor’s note: We learn from this contract that USAFRICOM will be operating in all of the aforementioned countries through 2017. Where is the democratic debate within the U.S. about committing military assets to these nations?]

CGI Federal received $45,581,891 for services in support of the Human Terrain System requirement. [Editor’s note: The Pentagon’s Human Terrain program uses anthropologists to further military goals within warzones. Most anthropologists loathe the militarization/weaponization of their field.]

Systems & Technology Research received $7,477,220 for working on DARPA’s social media in strategic communication program.

Raytheon Oakley Systems received $7,932,976 for the research and development services in support of the detection of insider threats by identifying behaviors.

Kellogg Brown & Root Services received a maximum $134,151,953 for the development and construction of a land-based missile defense system in Deveselu, Romania.

AFGHANISTAN CONTRACTS

In July 2013, the Pentagon issued twelve distinct contracts to corporations receiving money to work in Afghanistan. These contracts contradict assertions that the U.S. military will significantly reduce its forces in Afghanistan during 2014. These contracts illustrate the Pentagon’s clear intent to remain in Afghanistan for an indefinite timeframe:

DRS Technical Services received $25,511,888 for the “development, deployment and maintenance of tactical and management information technology systems and products.” Work will be performed in Afghanistan.

General Dynamics received $12,002,200 for “total integrated ground equipment readiness contractor logistics support.” 57 percent ($6,841,254) of this work will be performed in Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan. Work is expected to be completed by September 2014.

Inglett & Stubbs International received a maximum of $11,391,894 for inspection and repair services in Afghanistan.

Jorge Scientific received $11,810,908 to provide counterinsurgency advisory and assistance team services throughout Afghanistan.

Leonie Industries received $48,852,000 for media and marketing services in support of the Information Operations Task Force-Afghanistan. [Editor’s note: Based on this description, this is essentially a contract wherein tax-dollars are used to market an unpopular war to a defiant people.]

Lockheed Martin received $14,623,204 for field service representatives in support of the vehicle optic surveillance system program, program manager, Marine Air Ground Task Force command, control and communications. 80 percent ($11,698,563) of the work will be performed in Afghanistan.

Logos Technologies received $9,286,625 for 19 donut hole kits to support the U.S. Army persistent ground surveillance systems Kestrel systems. 90 percent ($8,357,963) of the work will be performed in Afghanistan.

Navmar Applied Sciences received $11,207,449 in support of the persistent surveillance unmanned aerial system (PSUAS) for the U.S. Army. This contract includes the procurement of 15 additional Tiger Shark PSUAS air vehicles and 15 i200 turrets, which will be integrated into the PSUAS. 28 percent ($3,138,086) of the work will occur within the sovereign nation of Afghanistan.

Northrop Grumman received $38,353,781 for services in support of the vehicle and dismount exploitation radar system. Work will be performed in Afghanistan. 

PKL Services received $16,300,156 for maintenance in support of Marine Corps AH-1W, UH-1N, CH-53D/E, and CH-46E platforms. 22 percent ($3,586,034) of the work will be performed in Iraq/Afghanistan. Work expected to be completed in February 2014. 

SAIC received $30,000,000 for operations and maintenance of the Angel Fire Spiral 2/Blue Devil Block I sensor/ISR suites. Work will be performed in Afghanistan. 

Trace Systems received $6,953,728 to procure information technology support services in Afghanistan.

DRONES – A DIVERSE PORTFOLIO

These contracts are for a variety of unmanned aerial systems (UAS), which are commonly known as drones. Only one of the companies, General Atomics, is associated with the most prominent drones on the market, namely the Predator and the Reaper. The range of companies associated with drone technology, as evident below, is a testament to the breadth and lucrative nature of the UAS market:

Bosh Global Services received a maximum $60,000,000 for small unmanned aircraft systems training, logistics support and technical management services.

CAE USA received $19,806,624 for MQ-1/9 contract aircrew training and courseware development training. Work will be performed at Creech Air Force Base, Holloman Air Force Base, March Air Reserve Base, Hancock Field and “other locations that may be required in the future in accordance with the performance work statement.”

General Atomics received $23,951,449 for systems tasks, upgrades and service on the “MQ-9 Hunter and Killer System Development and Demonstration (SDD) bridge effort.”

Insitu Inc. received $8,528,000 to “address hardware obsolescence issues and align two previously delivered early operational capability RQ-21A small tactical unmanned aircraft systems to the current system configuration.”

URS Technical Services received $14,219,315 for supporting ACC’s Unmanned Aircraft System Operations Center, including MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper platforms. Work will be performed at Creech Air Force Base, Ellsworth Air Force Base, Holloman Air Force Base and Whiteman Air Force Base. Eight percent ($1,137,545) of the effort supports foreign military sales for the United Kingdom. 

AMBIGUITY AND IMPRECISION

Many U.S. citizens, entrenched in the duopoly paradigm of Red-Blue politics, believe the Obama Administration has embraced transparency. The following contracts highlight precisely how opaque Obama’s Pentagon is:

Advanced Mission Systems received $8,437,960 for training and instruction services. EADS received $21,767,416 for continued contractor logistical support services. CGI Federal received $48,295,193 for “operational and environment core function services to provide the common framework in which war-fighting programs and strategies are conceived, defined and executed.” Lockheed Martin received $138,476,929 for communications technical support services for the U.S. Air Force Central Command. Jacobs Technology received a maximum $45,000,000 for the procurement of global logistics and support services. SAP Government Support and Services received a maximum $7,148,785 for services in support of enterprise resource planning.

None of these contracts tell the U.S. taxpayers, who fund the U.S. Department of Defense, a single detail about the final destination of their tax-dollars.

POLLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CLEAN-UP

The Pentagon leaves behind a toxic footprint at old weapons ranges and sundry bases. In July 2013, the Pentagon issued ten distinct contracts involving some form of environmental clean-up:

AECOM, Tidewater, EA Engineering, SAIC, ARCADIS U.S. and Jacobs Engineering Group received a maximum $125,000,000 for the removal and clean-up efforts of hazardous, toxic and radioactive waste and military munitions. Tetra Tech, GMI-AECOM and CH2M Hill received a maximum $75,000,000 to “accomplish natural resource services and compliance and related environmental planning services in support of the U.S. Navy.” ECC Remediation Services received a maximum $40,000,000 for various services in support of the Military Munitions Response Program.

Weeks Marine received a maximum $14,295,950 for services in support of the Maryland Beach e-nourishment Project. URS Federal Services received $19,550,631 for hazardous materials management services. Bay West, Engineering Remediation Resources Group, RMC South Earth, HydroGeologic, EA Engineering, Science and Technology, North Wind, Earth Resources Technology, Bhate Environmental Associates, PIKA/Arcadis and Zapata Inc. received a maximum $250,000,000 for the environmental remediation services in support of the Military Munitions Response Program.

GPC received a maximum $250,000,000 for services to manage, maintain and operate the emergency ship salvage material system (ESSM) and support the Navy’s oil and hazardous substances spill response program. Brady G2, Enviro Compliance Solutions, Accord Engineering, RORE-ITSI Joint Venture and Environmental Cost Management received $15,000,000 for “environmental consulting services” in support of various government programs. This contract includes support for guiding and managing environmental projects and environmental reporting and document preparation.

TriEco/Tetra Tech received a maximum $7,500,000 for “hazardous material and waste management services in Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.” FPM Remediations received $13,267,405 for environmental remediation activities at Joint Base Charleston, SC and Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, NC.

NO COMPETITION – HOW DOD PROCURES NUMEROUS CONTRACTS

The Pentagon often exploits various rules and bylaws in order to expedite contract production or to avoid subjecting contracts to a competitive bidding process. At least the Pentagon is honest in this respect; it included clauses stating “this contract was not competitively procured” in eight contracts during July 2013:

General Electric received $15,691,247 for the procurement of “time critical parts for incorporation into the T-408-GE-400 gas turbine engine in support of the CH-53K helicopter program” This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to FAR 6.302-2-1(a)(1). 

SAIC received $6,976,110 for training and support for U.S. Fleet Forces Command, associated fleet commands and activities conducting fleet training. This contract was not competitively procured in accordance with FAR 8.405-6(a)(1)(i)(A), “Unusual and Compelling Urgency.” 

Andromeda Systems received $7,700,000 for delivering software tools in support of maintenance planning, scheduling, and execution (MPS&E) and for integrating this software across the Naval Aviation Enterprise. These software tools originated with the E-6B aircraft and will now be developed for Naval Aviation Enterprise-wide usage. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1). 

Data Link Solutions received $33,368,569 to develop, design and implement four nets of concurrent multi-netting with concurrent contention receive (CMN-4) on the multifunctional information distribution system joint tactical radio system (MIDS JTRS) terminal configuration. This delivery order was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1). 

Lockheed Martin received $39,427,558 to provide flight test, technical, management, and process support services in support of the MH-60R/S and SH-60B aircraft. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 USC 2304(c)(1). 

Harris Corp. received $22,117,791 for Harris radios and associated components which will be utilized within the CBRNE Response enterprise that interfaces with first responders, National Guard teams, military tactical components, law enforcement, and other Department of Defense (DOD) entities.  This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1). 

Lockheed Martin received $12,878,468 for the repair coverage of 25 items for the common cockpit of the H-60R/S helicopters. The contract was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1). 

Northrop Grumman received $24,859,823 for providing repair parts to the Navy. The contract was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1). 

U.S. NAVY

Eleven companies furnished fifteen contracts pertaining to the U.S. Navy. These contracts totaled $326,849,904 and cost between $7,526,038 and $110,781,296. BAE took home five distinct contracts within this group. The remaining contracts went to: 3 Phoenix, AMTEK SCP, BAE, CACI, Computer Sciences Corporation, EDO Professional Services, General Dynamics, Oceaneering International, Raytheon, Rite Solutions, and SEACON Phoenix.

CONSTRUCTION & MAINTENANCE

Forty-six companies (including some joint ventures) serviced thirty-five distinct contracts pertaining to DOD Construction & Maintenance. These contracts totaled $2,786,063,446 and cost between $6,633,675 and $712,000,000. (The latter amount was paid to three companies for construction and services “in support of the Air Force medical service healthcare facilities modernization program”).

These projects included, but were not limited to: design services for energy efficient projects and services; renovation of existing aircraft maintenance facilities; construction of a dental clinic facility at Fort Leonard Wood, MO; construction of a new cadet barracks at the U.S. Military Academy; construction of airfield security upgrades at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort; construction services in support of the Defense Logistics Agency; construction services in support of the Kansas Army National Guard; maintenance, repair and operations for South Central Zone 2 Region, North Central Region and South Central Zone 1 Region; renovation of Scott Barracks at the U.S. Military Academy; upgrades in facilities at Naval Base Guam; construction at the Nolan Building parking garage at Fort Belvoir, VA; and the purchase of various metals.

The companies include: Anthony and Gordon Construction; B & K Construction Company; Barnhill Contracting; BCI Construction USA; BME & Sons; CCI Solutions; CH2M Hill/Clark Nexsen Energy Partners Joint Venture; Dutra Dredging; Federal Contracting Inc. (doing business as Bryan Construction); FSA + JKC Joint Venture One; Gilbane Federal; J E Dunn Construction; United Excel Corporation; Graybar Electric Company; Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company; Greenway Enterprises; Hensel Phelps Construction; HITT Contracting; Innovative Technical Solutions; Barlovento; Bhatel Brasfield & Gorrie;

CH2M HILL; Jacobs & Architects Hawaii Joint Venture; Johnson Controls Federal Systems; Smith & Wesson Security Solutions; Zachry Federal Construction; Kiewit Infrastructure South; LBL Contracting;

Lifecycle Construction Services; PentaCon; Anthony & Gordon Construction; Luhr Bros; MACNAK & Korte Joint Venture; Massman Construction; Nan Inc.; Necaise Brothers Construction; Norfolk Dredging; Phylway Construction; SAIC; Senne & Company; SourceAmerica; SupplyCore; SURVICE Engineering Company; Turner Strategic Technologies; TW Metals; and Walsh Construction Company II.

SUPPORT, EQUIPMENT, PARTS AND TRAINING

Although this category encompasses a wide variety of products and services, all of the contracts pertain to supporting, equipping, or training the soldier, sailor, airman and Marine:

Accenture received $50,137,716 for services in support of the General Fund Enterprise Business System. AQUATE Corp. received $15,313,067 for products and services to joint program offices and other federal agency customers dependent on CBRN and high yield explosives equipment in support of their missions. Armorsource received a maximum $92,681,250 for procurement of lightweight, advanced combat helmets.

Carter Enterprises received $58,111,772 for the procurement of soldier plate carrier systems and related items and services. Carter Industries received a maximum $9,244,800 for improved combat vehicle crewmen universal camouflage pattern coveralls. Center Industries received a maximum $44,270,394 for the procurement of improved magazines for the M4/M4A1 carbine.

Champion Energy Services received $729,167 for retail electric service. Critigen-Clark Nexsen Joint Venture received a maximum $35,000,000 for geographic information systems, professional surveying and mapping services. First Support Services received $6,960,811 for continuation of ground support equipment maintenance services.

General Dynamics received $8,534,065 for the procurement of 20mm MK244-0 armor piercing discarding Sabot cartridges. GPS Source received a maximum $16,613,430 for the procurement of defense advanced global positioning system receiver distributed devices. HDT Tactical Systems and Design West Technologies received a maximum $10,967,588 for the procurement of M98 gas filters and M98 gas-particulate filter sets.

ICx Technologies Inc. (doing business as Agentase Inc.) received $21,768,549 for services in support of the Joint Program Manager for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Contamination Avoidance program.

Iris Technology received $6,622,350 for the procurement of 1,325 solar power adaptors (SPA II) in support of the Product Manager Expeditionary Power Systems, Program Manager Combat Service Support. Isometrics received a maximum $48,480,975 for the procurement of modular fuel system — tank rack modules and associated services.

Lockheed Martin received $101,604,039 for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. Lockheed Martin received $11,796,483 to fabricate, test, and deliver a spectral beam combined fiber laser subsystem. Lockheed Martin received $35,604,779 for the development of the M270A1 fire control system.

Manufacturing Techniques received $16,196,816 for lowest replaceable units and upgrade kits for ground based operational surveillance system (GBOSS) to be used by the U.S. Marine Corps. GBOSS systems provide “24-hour persistent, ground-based surveillance capability.” McRae Industries received a maximum $13,996,006 for Army hot weather combat boots.

Northrop Grumman received $12,915,678 to provide exercise and training support to command staff, battle staff, and Theater Special Operations Commands. Northrop Grumman received $59,568,528 for operation and maintenance services for the combined tactical training ranges. Northrop Grumman received $6,786,896 for the improvement of the joint tactical ground station system. Northrop Grumman received $7,586,449 for planning, programming and budgeting services. Northrop Grumman received $8,070,540 for the operation and maintenance of the Department of the Navy, NCIS law enforcement information exchange system and DOD law enforcement information system. Northrop Grumman received a maximum $17,225,000 for the procurement of repair and calibration of secondary items in support of the integrated family of test equipment.

NuStar Terminals Operations Partnership received maximum $23,347,060 for a fuel storage terminal and services to receive, store, and ship government owned petroleum products. Parker Hannifin received a maximum $181,700,000 for wheel equipment, parts and assemblies. QinetiQ North America received $20,359,579 for procurement of man transportable robotic system (MTRS) MK 2 post-production support for joint service explosive ordnance disposal.

Raytheon received $9,618,024 for the repair of the H-60 multi-spectral targeting system forward looking infrared turrets. Raytheon received a maximum $83,500,000 for spare parts, components and repairs for various radar systems.

SRCTec Inc. received a maximum $221,800,000 for the procurement of lightweight counter mortar radars and related parts and services. Systems, Planning, and Analysis received $7,046,611 for support to the Office of International Technology Security in planning and executing the Military Critical Technology Program. Technical and Project Engineering received a maximum $10,751,221 for services in support of the Army training models.

Tecmotiv received a maximum $11,025,485 for depot-level engine repairs in support of the M88A2 Heavy Recovery Vehicle. URS Federal Services received $11,844,224 for material distribution services including receipt, storage, and issue.

MISSILES AND MISSILE DEFENSE

BAE received $534,873,321 to provide engineering, support and training for the Minuteman III. Engineering Research and Consulting received $32,438,092 for research in propulsion sciences. Exelis Systems received $26,656,675 for Launch and Test Range System support functions to the Eastern and Western Range: range sustainment, and external user support, projects and engineering services. General Dynamics received $32,679,084 work on Aegis gun and guided-missile directors (MK82 Mod 0), Aegis director controllers (MK 200 Mod 0) and for associated material and engineering services and for six Aegis Weapon System ship sets. Gray Research received $21,886,024 (from $222,609,913 to $244,495,937) for providing data management services for the Missile Defense Data Center Program.

Lockheed Martin received $11,996,522 to support NORAD operations. In a separate contract, Lockheed Martin received $20,794,692 to support NORAD operations. Lockheed Martin received $295,017,067 (increasing the total contract value from $1,439,566,895 to $1,734,583,962) for servicing and developing the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Baseline. Lockheed Martin received $9,552,979 to provide security hardware, associated software, equipment installation, system test, accreditation, certification and delivery of nuclear weapon security system equipment at U.S. Navy Installations.

Raytheon lost $24,969,580 for reducing the quantity of Standard Missile-3 Block IB missiles manufactured from 24 to 20 and for resolving technical and production transition issues. Raytheon received $16,676,423 for the depot-level diagnostics and repair of the Patriot missile system. Raytheon received $402,880,000 for software maintenance; models and simulations; engineering support and Ballistic Missile Defense System test planning; and execution and analysis for X-Band radars. Raytheon received $57,234,211 (increasing the total contract value from $1,536,747,151 to $1,593,981,362) for Standard Missile-3 Block IIA future upgrades and engineering support.

AIRCRAFT PRODUCTION AND MAINTENANCE

Bell Helicopter (Textron) received $17,907,086 for systems engineering and program management services in support of the H-1 upgrade program. BGI received $36,795,547 for EC-130H & A-10 contract aircrew training and courseware development training programs.

Boeing received $17,001,833 for work on next generation jammer (NGJ) pod hardware integration in support of the EA-18G aircraft. Boeing received $2,042,060,385 for the procurement of 13 P-8A multi-mission maritime Lot IV aircraft and 13 ancillary mission equipment kits in support of the LRIP Lot IV aircraft and associated parts. Boeing received $8,110,882 for the procurement of 84 engineering change proposal 6282 AYC 1439 A1 retrofit kits in support of the F/A-18 E/F aircraft. Boeing received a maximum $39,619,052 for logistics support and fielding and training services for units receiving the CH-47F.

Defense Support Services received $46,097,112 for maintaining aircraft in support of the Naval Test Wing Pacific at Point Mugu and China Lake Naval Air Stations, CA. DynCorp received $99,939,297 for maintenance and logistics support for all aircraft and support equipment for which the Naval Test Wing Atlantic has maintenance responsibility.

EADS received $12,921,227 for contractor logistics support for the Army’s aviation assets. General Atomics received $7,297,342 for the procurement of base support, aircraft material and demobilization services.

General Electric received $87,034,442 for the procurement of 22 Lot 17 full rate production F414-GE-400 install engines for the F/A-18E/F aircraft. General Electric received a maximum $6,896,800 for combustion chamber liners.

IKBI Inc. received a maximum $7,692,387 for the procurement of an HC-130J Simulator Facility at Moody Air Force Base, GA. L-3 Communications received $33,174,360 for procuring 12 tactical operational flight trainer (TOFT) HD visual system kits; for purchase and delivery of HD projectors and mirrors for the six TOFTs at Air Station Miramar; delivery of four TOFT HD visual systems to NAS Whidbey Island; purchase and delivery of uninterrupted power sources for four TOFTs to support the HD visual systems at NAS Oceana; and purchase and delivery of spares kit(s). This order also provides for the procurement of HD visual systems for two Australian F/A-18E/F Super Hornets TOFTs for the Royal Australian Air Force (20 percent = $6,819,941).

Lockheed Martin received $53,600,000 for six B-2 line replaceable units, data, material lay-in, and overhaul management. Lockheed Martin received $70,358,000 to provide parts, material and components required for the delivery of seven Conventional Take Off and Landing F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft and one Short Take-Off Vertical Landing F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft for the government of Italy

Machining Technologies received a maximum $79,900,000 for the procurement of 120mm M31 tail fins. Moog Inc. received a maximum $7,674,650 for V-22 aircraft swashplate actuators.

Northrop Grumman received $617,058,000 for the production of five Full Rate Production Lot 1 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. Work will be performed in St. Augustine, FL; Syracuse, NY; Bethpage, NY; El Segundo, CA; Indianapolis, Indiana; Menlo Park, CA; Rolling Meadows, IL; and approximately 200 various locations within the United States — none over five percent (32.10 percent). Northrop Grumman received $9,293,000 to procure materials and related support for the full rate production of five E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Lot 2 aircraft. Northrop Grumman received a maximum $40,278,672 for procurement of outer wing panels.

Raytheon received $279,400,000 in support of the Technology Development (TD) Phase of the Next Generation Jammer (NGJ) Program, which will replace the aging ALQ-99 tactical jamming system for integration on the EA-18G tactical aircraft.

Rockwell Collins received $13,569,781 for 19 low rate initial production modification kits for the KC-135 CNS/ATM Block 45 upgrade. Rolls Royce Corp. received $22,439,403 for additional power-by-the-hour in support of the KC-130J aircraft propulsion system.

Scientific Research Corp. received $8,974,067 for the procurement of 200 Multi-Function Color Display (MFCD) units and associated technical data to support forced retrofit of MFCD units into T-45 aircraft.

TRI-COR Industries received $73,903,803 for applications, infrastructure and systems support, Increment 2 (AISS II) services in support of the Mobility Air Force Command and control and in-transit visibility/business systems.

United Technologies Corp. received $133,979,288 for sustainment, site activation and depot activation efforts in support of the Joint Strike Fighter Propulsion System Low Rate Initial Production Lot VI governments of the UK ($2,889,881; 2.1 percent); Italy ($2,743,250; 2 percent); Turkey ($2,094,260; 1.6 percent); Australia ($2,094,260; 1.6 percent); the Netherlands ($1,779,956; 1.3 percent); Canada ($1,361,104; 1 percent); Norway ($1,005,376; .8 percent); and Denmark ($627,949; .4 percent).

Woodward HRT received a maximum $24,662,559 for supply spare parts to support numerous aircraft platforms.

CYBER, ISR, COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS

Bluewater Communications Group; Globecomm Systems; and TVC Communications received a maximum $45,000,000 to provide Cisco satellite decoders and HD encryption systems for the Defense Media Activity.

Booz Allen Hamilton; CACI; Computer Sciences Corporation; General Dynamics One Source; Honeywell Technology Solutions; Engility; Lockheed Martin; SAIC; Scientific Research Corporation; Secure Mission Solutions; STG; Systems Research and Applications Corporation; and URS Federal Services received $179,908,600 for ISR, cyber, and space capabilities work. Options would bring the cumulative value to $899,543,400.

BOSH Global Services; Imagine One StraCon Venture; ISHPI Information Technologies; Sentek Global

CENTECH Group received $14,015,472 for operation and maintenance of the base network.

Dell; IBM; Unicom Government; CDW Government; Iron Bow Technologies; and World Wide Technology received $494,000,000 for the hardware, software and related integration services in support of the Information Technology Enterprise Solution-2.

Deloitte Consulting received a maximum $23,000,000 for requirements analysis, design, development, testing, fielding, sustainment, and Tier 3 (developmental and operational) support for a library of web services to support the AF/A1 human resources information technology portfolio.

Design West Technologies received $20,878,535 for the production, assembly, testing, and packaging of Communication Transponder Family of Systems communication assemblies composed of printed circuit boards, electronic components, and external enclosures. Exelis received $7,866,232 for replenishment spare parts for core memory units.

Galois Inc. received $8,147,278 for advanced multi-integration sensor engineering reports, and to research and develop automated techniques by which mission planners can design and build robust cyber warfare plans using intuitive graphical interfaces, and develop tools that automatically synthesize such plans into fully detailed, executable missions. Gichner Shelter Systems received $25,519,650 for the procurement of up to 400 mobile facility production units and technical data items.

Lockheed Martin received $35,670,673 for the procurement of information technology services for the Pentagon & National Capital Region. Lockheed Martin received $8,791,515 for Interim Contractor Sustainment FY12-15 Additional Scope for the Advance Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) System Development and Demonstration Program (SDD).

Lockheed Martin; TYBRIN; Harris IT Services; SRA International; Raytheon; and L-3 National Security Solutions received $960,000,000 for Network-Centric Solutions-2 (NETCENTS-2) Application Services.

Progeny Systems received $10,989,287 for Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase III engineering and technical support services in support of SBIR Topic No.N03-049, “Automation and Work Flow Advances Using Technology Infusions for Manning Reduction” – a Navy-wide implementation of portal technology for internal and external information sharing requirements.

Raytheon received $33,989,127 for developing and testing various command post terminals with presidential and national voice conferencing for the family of advanced beyond line-of-sight terminals. SAIC received $10,196,609 for services supporting Military Sealift Command’s (MSC) information technology (IT) ashore operations. Siemens Medical Solutions received a maximum $28,173,642 for digital imaging network-picture archive communication systems.

Skylla Engineering; and Chugach Federal Solution received $19,752,906 for equipment and services associated with C5S, ISR, information operations, enterprise information services and space capabilities. Software AG Government Solutions received $10,274,000 for software AG Flex Perpetual licenses and maintenance support.

Sotera Defense Systems received a maximum $97,850,000 for design, construction, testing and delivery services in support of the electronic warfare planning and management tool. SRI International received $230,000,000 for hardware, software, prototype systems, spiral software enhancements and installation training support for the Digital Video Laboratory III. Systems Engineering Support Company received $15,189,906 for Communication Transponder Family of Systems communication assemblies composed of printed circuit boards, electronic components, and external enclosures.

TeleCommunication Systems received $6,865,586 for the design, development, delivery, and evaluation of a prototype Intelligent Tutoring System capability and associated content for the Navy’s information technology rating “A” School at the Center for Information Dominance in Pensacola, FL.

Telecommunications Systems; By Light Professional IT Services; Cytech Communications; iGov Technologies; Sierra Nevada; and D & S Consultants received a maximum $48,000,000 for various command, control, communications and computer support services for users located at Fort Bragg, NC.

TT Government Solutions received $13,099,606 for OMEGA, which “provides for the development of technologies to construct mission plans and automatically synthesize plans to an executable mission script and to develop technologies to formally verify plans and quantify the expected effects and outcomes.” Mission construction involves the “development of cyber warfare domain specific languages, program synthesis and automated program construction from high-level specifications.”

Verizon received $11,935,014 for the procurement of managed network services.

ViaSat received $19,487,844 to develop and implement four nets of concurrent multi-netting with concurrent contention receive (CMN-4) on the multifunctional information distribution system joint tactical radio system (MIDS JTRS) terminal configuration. MIDS JTRS aims to transform the MIDS low volume terminal into a four-channel, software communications product, which will comply with joint tactical radio system terminals while maintaining current Link-16 and tactical air navigation capability.

FOOD SERVICES

Food Service Inc. received a maximum $660,000,000 for full line food distribution in support of customers located in Okinawa, Japan. Sysco Eastern Maryland (maximum $20,050,000); Sysco Foodservice Alabama (maximum $18,145,958); Sysco Hampton Roads (maximum $32,300,000); and US Foods ($37,120,746) were given contracts for prime vendor food and beverage support.

HEALTHCARE AND SANITATION

Fresenius Kabi received a maximum $67,798,372 for various pharmaceutical products. HamHed; Budget Services & Supplies; TATCO Services; and Radcorp Solutions received a maximum $20,000,000 for janitorial services. Marlex Pharmaceuticals Inc. received a maximum $56,598,301 for various pharmaceuticals. MedTrust received $20,381,274 for the extension of registered nursing services of various specialties. Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics received a maximum $14,097,291 for flu vaccines. Pacific Consolidated Industries received a maximum $21,000,000 for non-developmental electronic catalog system for electronic documents portable oxygen distribution system and accessories. Sanofi Pasteur received a maximum $14,216,201 for flu vaccines. TQM Inc. received a maximum $26,250,000 for medical equipment.

# # # #

Christian Sorensen, a BFP Contributing Author & Analyst, is a U.S. military veteran. His writing has been featured in CounterPunch and Media Roots.

*Any clerical errors are the author’s alone. In mid-September, Boiling Frogs Post will feature a similar distillation of August 2013’s DOD Contracts.


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Comments

  1. This was very cogent, and well put together. I was able to take in the data & I always appreciate that, but processing the absolute horror of black and white itemized evidence is “worldview shattering” effective. I hope to share this and wish to see a similar response from people around me, it would be a sign that humanity can awaken.
    Daily I am having my worldview shook, but truth trumps.
    Thank You for your diligence.

  2. $16,000,324,569.00 = $16 billions
    Total Iraq war cost is about $2 trillions

  3. Well said Annie.

    The organization and level of detail of the article is amazing. Incredible research. Very real and deeply disturbing. I’m going to share this article with as many people as I can and hopefully, who are also open, willing, and able to try to view the big picture that it paints.

  4. At this rate they would spend less than $200 billion/year, were it not for black budgets.

    Somewhere I read the black budget accounts for almost 60% of defense spending, currently. I expect that percentage to grow. The declassification process is lengthy and cumbersome, and is not speeding up commensurate with exponential technological advancement. Each year more stuff gets pumped into the black category than comes out the other end.

    If you think that means you don’t know the actual contours of our defense establishment and its capabilities – you are right. It will be that way and more so from here on.

  5. “A black budget is a budget that is allocated for classified and other secret operations of a nation, a corporation, a society of any form, a national department, and so on. A black budget usually covers expenses related to military research and covert operations. The black budget is mostly classified due to security reasons.”

    Black budget “black funds”. “Black funds” are made from drugs, robbery (Libia’s gold, blood diamonds) .. it can also be truckloads of cash from FED to be put into private planes?

    Operation “Stillpoint” was a Bush/Obama robbery of $1 trillion from the American people?

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